No More Canola Oil

Sadly, I used canola oil for years.  It was a great frying oil because of the high smoke point and we were still in the era of “all fats are bad for you”  so this was a healthier option….or so they told me.

Let’s start with the name…canola.  What plant exactly does that come from? I know olive oil comes from olives; coconut oil comes from coconuts; peanut oil comes from peanuts.  I don’t know about you but I haven’t seen any canola plants growing around here lately and that’s because canola oil doesn’t come from plants.  It is made in a lab.

The rapeseed, where canola oil was derived, has been found to be very toxic to humans.  So, what is all the rapeseed farmers to do?  Get scientists involved.  They found that by eliminating the glucosinolates and erucic acid out of the rapeseed plant, it lessened the toxicity.  This was accomplished by cross-breeding traditional plants.  The newly developed plant was named canola.  A combination of the names, Canadian and Ola (meaning oil) was given to the new plant from where it was first developed.  So,  you’re looking at a genetically modified product (GMO).

I am just giving you a very brief reasoning on why you should step away from the canola oil. But if you are a research junky like me, I have included some more in-depth reading on canola oil.  Dr. Axe has put together a great read called, 6 Canola Dangers.   What I want to do is show you some healthier, NATURAL options so you don’t have to use canola oil anymore.  Let’s just all agree to stay away from oils that are made in labs.

I am so glad that we are beginning to understand how important good fats are for our brain, skin, hair, and nails.  Using oils both cold and hot have an important purpose, and knowing which ones to use will not only benefit your health, but will make your food taste better too!

Cold Oils

Cold oils have great properties when they aren’t heated.  They make wonderful salad dressings and marinades.  They also can be used for natural body care products such as moisturizers, carrier oils, and scrubs.

  • Olive Oil
  • Coconut Oil
  • Macadamia Oil
  • Almond Oil
  • Walnut Oil
  • Avocado Oil
  • Grapeseed Oil
  • Sesame Oil

 

Smoke Points

Moving on to cooking with oils now, I need to discuss smoke point.  Smoke point is the temperature at which an oil releases smoke.  I didn’t know this for years.  I would always cook with basically two oils and would occasionally burn food and have no idea why.

Low Smoke Point Oils

This would be used for light sautéing or basting.  Smoke point goes up to 350 degrees.

  • Olive Oil
  • Butter/Ghee (clarified)

Meduim Smoke Point Oils

This would be for the intended use of sautéing, low frying, basting, or popping.  The smoke point would be between 360 and 410 degrees.

  • Coconut Oil
  • Macadamia Oil
  • Almond Oil
  • Walnut Oil

High Smoke Point Oils

This is for use when deep frying and has a smoke point of 420 degrees and higher.

  • Sunflower Oil
  • Safflower Oil
  • Avocado Oil
  • Grapeseed Oil
  • Sesame Oil
  • Palm Oil

What I didn’t Know…

When I used oils with the incorrect smoke points, the improper temperature would actually breakdown the qualities of the oil, much like microwaving our food does.  I would also have a lot of smoke in the kitchen.  I want the good qualities left in the oils so that my body can have the benefits from them… remember…. brain, hair, skin, and nail perks? This is why I like cold-pressed oils and stay away from fractionation and hydrogenation.

My Top Five

It’s hard to choose, but if I would list my favorite oils they would be:

  • Olive Oil
  • Coconut Oil
  • Almond Oil
  • Grapeseeed Oil
  • AND,  of course, my favorite fat…. organic, grass-fed, pasture-raised BUTTER! Can we please throw away the fake butter now….

 

Blesssings,

Stacey

The Fit Farmacy, Inc.

 

 

Disclaimer
All material on this website is provided for your information only and may not be construed as medical advice or instruction. No action or inaction should be taken based solely on the contents of this information; instead, readers should consult appropriate health professionals on any matter relating to their health and well-being.

 

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